Outcomes

the latest outcomes

Publications view all
our research
Small 2021, 2104204
Block-Copolymers Enable Direct Reduction and Structuration of Noble Metal-Based Films
Read Abstract
Noble metal nanostructured films are of great interest for various applications including electronics, photonics, catalysis, and photocatalysis. Yet, structuring and patterning noble metals, especially those of the platinum group, is challenging by conventional nanofabrication. Herein, an approach based on solution processing to obtain metal-based films (rhodium, ruthenium (Ru) or iridium in the presence of residual organic species) with nanostructuration at the 20 nm-scale is introduced. Compared to existing approaches, the dual functionality of block-copolymers acting both as structuring and as reducing agent under inert atmosphere is exploited. A set of in situ techniques has allowed for the capturing of the carbothermal reduction mechanism occurring at the hybrid organic/inorganic interface. Differently from previous literature, a two-step reduction mechanism is unveiled with the formation of a carbonyl intermediate. From a technological point of view, the materials can be solution-processed on a large scale by dip-coating as polymers and simultaneously structured and reduced into metals without requiring expensive equipment or treatments in reducing atmosphere. Importantly, the metal-based films can be patterned directly by block-copolymer lithography or by soft-nanoimprint lithography on various substrates. As proof-of-concept of application, the authors demonstrate that nanostructured Ru films can be used as efficient catalysts for H2 generation into microfluidic reactors.
Link to publication
our research
Small 2021, 2103561
Critical Role of Phosphorus in Hollow Structures Cobalt-Based Phosphides as Bifunctional Catalysts for Water Splitting
Read Abstract
Cobalt phosphides electrocatalysts have great potential for water splitting, but the unclear active sides hinder the further development of cobalt phosphides. Wherein, three different cobalt phosphides with the same hollow structure morphology (CoP-HS, CoP2-HS, CoP3-HS) based on the same sacrificial template of ZIF-67 are prepared. Surprisingly, these cobalt phosphides exhibit similar OER performances but quite different HER performances. The identical OER performance of these CoPx-HS in alkaline solution is attributed to the similar surface reconstruction to CoOOH. CoP-HS exhibits the best catalytic activity for HER among these CoPx-HS in both acidic and alkaline media, originating from the adjusted electronic density of phosphorus to affect absorption–desorption process on H. Moreover, the calculated ΔGH* based on P-sites of CoP-HS follows a quite similar trend with the normalized overpotential and Tafel slope, indicating the important role of P-sites for the HER process. Moreover, CoP-HS displays good performance (cell voltage of 1.67 V at a current density of 50 mA cm−2) and high stability in 1 M KOH. For the first time, this work detailly presents the critical role of phosphorus in cobalt-based phosphides for water splitting, which provides the guidance for future investigations on transition metal phosphides from material design to mechanism understanding.
Link to publication
our research
J. Synchrotron Rad. (2021). 28, 1978-1984
Tomography of a seeded free-electron laser focal spot: qualitative and quantitative comparison of two reconstruction methods for spot size characterization
Read Abstract
Performing experiments at free-electron lasers (FELs) requires an exhaustive knowledge of the pulse temporal and spectral profile, as well as the focal spot shape and size. Operating FELs in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft X-ray (SXR) spectral regions calls for designing ad-hoc optical layouts to transport and characterize the EUV/SXR beam, as well as tailoring its spatial dimensions at the focal plane down to sizes in the few micrometers range. At the FERMI FEL (Trieste, Italy) this task is carried out by the Photon Analysis Delivery and Reduction System (PADReS). In particular, to meet the different experimental requests on the focal spot shape and size, a proper tuning of the optical systems is required, and this should be monitored by means of dedicated techniques. Here, we present and compare two reconstruction methods for spot characterization: single-shot imprints captured via ablation on a poly(methyl methacrylate) sample (PMMA) and pulse profiles retrieved by means of a Hartmann wavefront sensor (WFS). By recording complementary datasets at and nearby the focal plane, we exploit the tomography of the pulse profile along the beam propagation axis, as well as a qualitative and quantitative comparison between these two reconstruction methods. (C) 2021 Optical Society of America under the terms of the OSA Open Access Publishing Agreement
Link to publication
Deliverables view all
WP14 - JA4 - A safe-by design platform for nanomaterials
D14.1 - Definition of relevant safe-by-design protocols for access by users
Read Abstract
Nanotechnology and nanomaterials are key players in the EU research and innovation processes having a tremendous impact on many domains of applications ranging from electronics, textiles, cosmetics, agriculture, and food to health applications. The next generation of nanomaterials i.e. smart nanomaterials is expected to represent a step forward by providing nanomaterials with new properties and functionalities and thus adding values to existing products and technologies with high benefits for human health and environment. Consequently, a large increase in the development and use of new kinds of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) is expected in the near future. To favour safe innovation there is an urgent need for robust, standardized and advanced methods for nanomaterials safety assessments. ENMs safety assessment remains a challenging task due to the complexity of nanomaterials since they may display a wide range of properties including size, shape, surface functionalisation, surface charge, that affect their way of interacting with biological systems such as biological fluids (protein-surface interactions) and living cells (cellular uptake, mechanisms of toxic response). This report describes a set of workflows aiming for studying the interactions between ENMs and biological systems with an advanced ‘safe by design’ experimental platform. The workflows consist in integrated sequences of steps for guiding users with different comprehensive analysis methods among a wide range of facilities available within the NEP consortium. This platform will support materials scientists to design new or improved materials with a safer approach from the early stage of ENMs synthesis and nanosafety researchers to elucidate the interactions and effects of ENMs with biological samples (human, animal or plant cells) in order to understand the life cycle (uptake, dispersion, accumulation) of ENMs in biological systems.
Download full report
WP17 - Communication and Dissemination
D 17.3 - NFFA Communication Toolkit
Read Abstract
This document outlines the development of the communication toolkit in support of NFFA Europe Pilot communication activities. A series of different materials have been produced to communicate effectively with target audiences, to support stakeholder-engagement, to promote the project among established and potentially new users and raise awareness about NFFA-Europe infrastructures in general and in particular about the new research opportunities offered thanks to NFFA-Europe Pilot. This deliverable describes the development of the communication toolkit including the updated NFFA-Europe and the resulting NFFA-Europe PILOT visual identity. The visual identity is the cornerstone of all material produced and runs like a red line through the entire design, and includes the logo, the word templates and the corporate presentation, used to present the NFFA-Europe project at conferences.
Download full report
WP2 - MGT2 - Pilot scheme for the management of a distributed research infrastructure offering harmonised, interoperable and integrated services
D2.2 - Integrated tool for access monitoring
Read Abstract
The present deliverable describes the overall design and structure of the integrated online system to support the IDRIN operation. Taking into account the outcome of Task 2.1 (Infrastructure set-up and operation, guidance to access providers and users) described in Deliverable D2.1 (Detailed procedures for integrated TA), the system has been designed to integrate into a Single Entry Point all the tools for the management of the techniques catalogue, the proposals, the users, the projects, in a set of standardized online procedures. The system will collect and organize a large set of data and information that will be the base for a Business Intelligence Analytics tool, that will allow a continuous monitoring of the IDRIN operation. This deliverable describes the technical aspects of the different components of the platform and offers an overview of its main functionalities.
Download full report
Transnational Access Statistics
15 calls for access
495 proposals submitted
65% rate of acceptance
32% with Large Scale Facilities
13% with theory
12% with industry
~3 average users per proposal
56 countries applying
1457 lab sessions